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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then in the colony's some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: right. the common law right to have the firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of these? >> guest: local commanders, towns. later on became more broadbased, but as tensions and hostility is mounted between the british authorities and the colonists in approach to the revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders of the time has an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time was there organized law enforcement or was it this group of volunteers on was that all law enforcement? >> guest: depends on the size of the town but there were not armed policemen
it at times, but he also had made remarks that allowed off the militia was a useful thing to have feared it could have built the continental army that the existence of the militias and people who would than in militias and more importantly volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms and that was key. >> host: said people were using it on the frontier, protections against the native americans, hunting certainly am in the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. as to exactly. the common moderate to have and use firearms became the pacific duty to use them and called upon. >> host: who was in charge of malicious? >> guest: local commander towns very often have them, new england certainly. later on they became more broadly based. but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities in the colonists and the approach to the revolutionary war, he was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: at this time, was to organize one person in these communities are with this group of voluntee
ingredient you can use in the kitchen. you can do anything to it. you can bake it, rustic, barbecue it, just amazing. >> lorraine wallace are these are recipes? >> all of my recipes and they been tried and tested and it's what i love to do. >> i am the tester. i have not cooked any of them but i had eaten everyone. >> it has family stories, family recipes and a family tip that about a. >> can you give us a little background on you two, how long you have been married? >> we have six children and we have been together for 16 years. >> but i have to say if the old-fashioned way. i had four and she had two. >> getting your family around the table and trying to figure out everybody schedule and their needs, including their husband who has 5:00 in the morning get up on sunday. it's amazing, so this great book helps you do that. >> what time do you be the chicken on sunday? >> we eat saturday night. >> soup is on sunday. >> hence the night, saturday night chicken. >> you would think i would have caught that. mr. sunday saturday night chicken, lorraine wallace, chris and lorraine wallace thank you v
to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. .. >> i didn't know what to do about it. all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about the experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had i have no words for it, other than adolescence. other than going out. finally, people were starting to stand back and say that this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. the director, lee hirsch and i started talking about this. voices started bubbling up to the service. this is not something we can expect from a normal culture. in april of 2009, it was right after to young people took their lives. both of those tragedies, i think really ignited a national recognition of what was going on for so long. and we were seeing parents writing into message boards. we were seeing every news story that. hundreds of comments from parents saying that my child is going through this. kids thing that i'm going through t
grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: so people used these on the frontier, protection against the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then during the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: exactly. the right, the common law right to have and use firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of the militias? >> guest: well, local commanders, towns had them, in new england certainly, and later on, they became more broadly based, but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities and the colonists, the approach to revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearms. >> host: the -- at this time was there organized law enforcement in the commun
and their families. so, thank you so much, cynthia, for being here today. why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself. how did you get here? how did you get drawn into the issue? y "bully," why now? >> guest: i come from a background as a writer and when i was in school i was one of those kids who was really shy, and i tried to sail under the radar and i was someone that solid taking place around me and i didn't know what to do about it. and as all of us i think in this country were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had no words for it other than adolescents other than growing up. finally people were starting to stand back and say hold on, this isn't actually a normal part of growing up, this isn't a normal right of passage. i think there was a moment when there was a possibility for change, and the director and i decided to start the film out of the feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up coming to the surface to say this isn't something that we can acc
-bullying activists and experts on how to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s. >> host: i'm so delighted to be here today with cynthia lowen, the producer of the widely-acclaimed and really important new documentary "bully" and the co-editor of the book by the same title. both of which out our nation's dirty little secret about bullying in schools across america. both the movie and the book put a human face on what it's about, how it impacts kids on both sides and on the sidelines and their families. so thank you so much, cynthia, for being here today. >> guest: thank you, donna. >> host: why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself. how did you get here? how did you get drawn to the issue? why bully? why you, why now? >> guest: well, i come from a background as a writer, and when i was in middle school, i was one of the kids who was really shy, um, i i think i tried to sail under the radar, and i was someone who i saw bullying taking place around me, and i didn't know what to do about it. and as all of us, i think, in this country were starting to see people coming
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)